Vote for Chad (part 6)

Why WE NEED to vote for Chad on November 5th:

Improving Public Works

We desperately need to improve our roads, sidewalks and bridges. Chad Ryan will work to implement a 24-hour response program in which a resident can call, text or tweet our Public Works Department regarding area road hazards like potholes, sidewalk rubble, faulty sewers or even snow removal, and be assured that the city will act within 24 hours.

 

Vote for Chad (part 5)

Why WE NEED to vote for Chad on November 5th:
Creating More Jobs
As someone who runs a successful family business, Chad is well aware of the challenges facing small businesses in this economy.  As your Common Councilor, Chad will keep taxes low, so that we can create a healthy economic environment that will keep local graduates in our community.

 

Vote for Chad (part 4)

Why WE NEED to vote for Chad on November 5th:

Chad Ryan is a lifelong resident of Tipperary Hill and helps manage a successful small business. On the Common Council, Chad will fight to bring new jobs and industries to our region, revitalize the Syracuse School District and improve our quality of life.

Vote for Chad (part 2)

Why WE NEED to vote for Chad on November 5th:

ECONOMY: As someone who runs a successful family business, Chad is well aware of the challenges facing small businesses in this economy. He understands how crucial it is to keep taxes low, so that we can create a healthy economic environment that will keep local graduates in our community.

Common Council: Most Districts Feature Contested Races

“Chad Ryan (Democrat)
Chad RyanFor this open seat, Ryan, 28, is a first-time candidate for public office. On Sept. 10, he won the Democratic primary against former Syracuse Police Chief Steve Thompson. Ryan is a third-generation funeral director for Edward J. Ryan & Son Funeral Home in Syracuse. His family has deep political roots. His father, Ed Ryan, is a former county legislator who recently retired as the Democratic elections commissioner.

Getting people to move back to the city, Ryan said, is the first step to improving the city’s fiscal issues. “If you get people living in the neighborhoods that care about the neighborhoods, if they start going to their association meetings, if they start complaining about things,” said Ryan, “then issues get resolved there

Common Council: Most Districts Feature Contested Races